Diamond Comics Owner Donates Thousands of Comic Books and Comic Art to the Library of Congress

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The collection includes an extremely rare series of six storyboards detailing "the story layout and action for Walt Disney’s 1928 animated film, “Plane Crazy.”

Comic-book-men-601-steve-geppi-1200x707Comic books and popular culture have an overwhelming impact on play. Over the years, toys bearing licenses from the Walt Disney Company, Marvel, DC and more have contributed billions of dollars in revenue to the toy industry.

It is with that in mind that I want to take a moment and remark on the just announced, contribution made by Diamond Comics Owner, Stephen A. Geppi, to the Library of Congress. According to the Library's press release  ("Library Receives Donation of Popular Art Valued in the Millions"):

Stephen A. Geppi has donated to the nation’s library more than 3,000 items from his phenomenal and vast personal collection of comic books and popular art, including the original storyboards that document the creation of Mickey Mouse.  This multimillion-dollar gift includes comic books, original art, photos, posters, newspapers, buttons, pins, badges and related materials, and select items will be on display beginning this summer. 

Mr. Geppi certainly works on a grand scale. His collection is reported to be one of the largest in existence and his company, Diamond Comics, is one of the largest comic book distributors in the world. It is impressive to see someone like Mr. Geppi combine a passion, a collector's eye, an entrepreneur's boldness and a solid business sense together in creating not just economic value for the present but cultural value for posterity.

According to the press release: The collection includes an extremely rare series of six storyboards detailing "the story layout and action for Walt Disney’s 1928 animated film, “Plane Crazy.”  It was the first Mickey Mouse cartoon produced, but the third to be released, after sound was added…"

In addition to Mr. Geppi's gift, the Library holds more than 140,000 issues of about 13,000 comic book titles, dating back to the 1930s."

I plan to visit the Library of Congress this summer and see the exhibition. You may want to plan a visit to Washington as well.

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