Toy Tech: The Mighty Pencil – Part 4 of 4

Joseph-header

SAPULICH_YOUNGBLOOD

YOUNGBLOOD: JOSEPH
SAPULICH © 2013

The sketch of my son Joshua has many key fine art features which lead to an emotionally impactful image. These ingredients include the use
of line, tonal value, active movement of pencil strokes and the directional
flow of light—all of which are also present in the commercial design sketches.
For example, the Iron Man toy sketch (see part one of this article) holds true to the same principles as do
 the faster and
much rougher Star Wars ideation sketches (part two).

Now of course, in the toy
design sketches, no fancy background is needed like the fine art piece but all
of the other elements are in place because they are basic principles. They work
together like musical notes flowing from individual instruments uniting
together to produce a symphony. Maybe that’s too superfluous a metaphor—at the
end of the day it just looks cool.  

LOONEYWARNER BROTHERS © 2013, CREATA © 2013

So, the line dividing fine art from design art is often blurred for good reason. What I love about toy design is the need to always grow and learn new things. To always look beyond the normal to find the extraordinary. To see things others might have missed and to consciously make the decision to look at life with the mindset of a visionary. So, dream big! Think outside the box and convey your ideas with the visual impact and confidence they deserve.

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